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Morgan, HelenEncyclop dia Britannica Article

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original name  Helen Riggins American actress and singer whose talent was shown to greatest effect in the 1920s and '30s as a nightclub performer of songs of heartbreak and hard living.

Helen Riggins took the name Morgan in her childhood when her divorced mother remarried. Various conflicting accounts of her entry into show business survive, but she apparently obtained some voice training, sang in speakeasies, and in 1920 got a job in the chorus of Florenz Ziegfeld's Sally. More nightclub singing in Chicago and perhaps a beauty contest in Montreal led to a small role in George White's Scandals in 1925. In that year she had an engagement at Billy Rose's Backstage Club, where the crowded conditions obliged her to perch on her accompanist's piano, an informal touch that soon became a trademark.

On Broadway Morgan appeared in Americana (1926), Grand Guignol (1927), and Show Boat (1927), in which she was a sensation singing “Bill” and “Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man.” She starred in Sweet Adeline (1929), in which she sang “Don't Ever Leave Me” and “Why Was I Born?” Her later shows, less successful, include The Ziegfeld Follies of 1931, Memory (1934), George White's Scandals of 1936, and A Night at the Moulin Rouge (1939). She also appeared in a number of motion pictures, including Applause (1929), Roadhouse Nights (1930), Sweet Music (1935), Frankie and Johnnie (1935), and Show Boat (1936).

Morgan's real strength, however, was as a club singer. Small and pale, she had a sweet, artless, and blues-tinged voice that made her the ideal performer of the new sort of popular song that was being written in the 1920s and '30s: ironic, sometimes bitter, distinctly urban, and full of the disappointment, loneliness, and joyless hedonism that filled the smoky clubs.